Reviews

‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’: This is why Netflix exists
Arts & Entertainment, Reviews

‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’: This is why Netflix exists

Story and image by JAVIER DOSAMANTES “The Eyes of Tammy Faye”Directed by: Michael ShowalterRating: PG-13Run time: 2 hours, 6 minutesShowing at The Loft Cinema Making a good biopic is one of the hardest things to pull off in filmmaking because you're trying to fit a person's whole life into a two-hour format. And at the same time, you want to approach the subject with a creative angle instead of just making a glamoured-up reenactment. Without getting too technical, biopics are structured in two different ways: in chronological order (following life's events from beginning to end) or concentrating on a landmark event or time of a person's life, then using flashbacks to add context and backstory. "The Eyes of Tammy Faye" opens with a scene in 1994, then jumps back to Faye...
A waiting game of fate
Arts & Entertainment, Reviews

A waiting game of fate

Story and image by JAVIER DOSAMANTESPima Post “The Card Counter”Directed by: Paul SchraderRating: RRun time: 1 hour, 51 minutesShowing at The Loft Cinema Redemption and fate have a unique relationship, although the latter is not always reciprocal to anyone or anything.  Paul Schrader continues to explore this in his new film "The Card Counter," a movie about a mysterious and disciplined lonely gambler who thinks he can outlast his fate by walking in circles. Leonardo da Vinci is best known for the Mona Lisa, the Detroit Lions for being proverbial losers and Schrader for writing about morally flawed and darkly complex antiheroes. William Tell (Oscar Isaac) is the latest Schrader protagonist. He continues a famed lineage of characters that includes Travis Bic...
‘Prisoners of the Ghostland’: a masterclass on how not to direct movies
Arts & Entertainment, Features, Opinion, Reviews

‘Prisoners of the Ghostland’: a masterclass on how not to direct movies

Story and image by Javier Dosamantes 'Prisoners of the Ghostland'Directed by: Sion SonoRating: NRRun time: 1 hour, 53 minutesShowing at The Loft Cinema Back in 2010, chicken franchise KFC launched the Double Down. It was a chicken sandwich that instead of having two pieces of bread to hold together the meat and fixings ... had two fried chicken fillets. The anatomy of the sandwich looked like this: a fried chicken fillet on the bottom, cheese, bacon and cheese in the middle, and topped off with another fried chicken fillet. It was a deliciously over-the-top and decadent idea. But without the bread to tie up the ingredients, the Double Down was incredibly messy and the flavors were too intense and chaotic instead of complementing each other.  It feels like good-...