AP EXPLAINER: What voting changes are on the midterm ballot?

By MEG KINNARD
Associated Press

Besides picking their elected representatives, voters across the country are deciding ballot measures that could reshape the ways they cast ballots in coming elections, or even how things get on the ballot.

About half of states allow citizen initiatives. That’s when groups can bypass a legislature by collecting a certain number of signatures of registered voters to put proposed laws or constitutional changes on the ballot. Executive or judicial officials often still have some role in the process, typically by certifying that ballot wording is clear and accurate, and that petition circulators gathered enough valid signatures of registered voters.

A number of measures on ballots this fall involve proposed changes to states’ election laws, as well as a slew of proposals dealing with the future handling of ballot initiatives themselves.

Here’s a look at some of them:

VOTER ID PROPOSALS

CHANGING PATHWAYS TO THE VOTE

Just four states — Alabama, Connecticut, Mississippi and New Hampshire — lack an in-person early voting option for all voters. Some states are looking to change that.

INITIATIVES ABOUT INITIATIVES

While plenty of other states have ballot measures about how people get to vote, Arizona is ground zero for initiatives about initiatives — many of them dealing with the future of initiatives themselves.

Since the majority of votes cast in Arizona are by mail, it’s unlikely that the outcome of these ballot questions will be known until after Nov. 8.

___

Meg Kinnard can be reached at http://twitter.com/MegKinnardAP

___ Check out https://apnews.com/hub/explaining-the-elections to learn more about the issues and factors at play in the 2022 midterm elections.

Follow AP’s coverage of the elections at: https://apnews.com/hub/2022-midterm-elections